AIR INDIA PILOTS

air-india-divestment-options-uncertain

Air India divestment options uncertain

The government is given four options on dealing with the divestment issue of the debt-ridden Air India. However, it is uncertain whether the government may be able to work on any of the given options in FY21.
A report submitted by Ernst & Young India, which is the transaction adviser on the issue, to the inter-ministerial group set up to coordinate and sort out issues regarding AI divestment, contains the following four options:
First, keeping the debt level at Rs 23,286 crore or reducing it further while changing the timelines.
Second, assigning no pre-fixed debt level and letting bidders quote a combined debt and equity value.
Third, the Government should continue running AI for the next 2-3 years.
Fourth and last, winding up AI thereafter.
The report points out that in view of the corona virus-induced global and domestic economic downturn, potential investors in the airline business are seen struggling to manage their own existing businesses. In this climate, it is difficult to predict how the divestment proposal of AI may be received, considering the company has a combined debt-cum-liabilities burden of about Rs 90,000 crore.
“The choice is between privatizing or closing down Air India,” Aviation Minister H. S. Puri recently stated in the Parliament. Based on the suggestions, the core group of secretaries and the ministerial panel handling the sale of the national carrier will decide the future course of action although it is unclear if the government will be able to decide on the much-delayed privatization during the current year.

19 Sep 2020
our-competent-pilots-handled-ils-failure-incident-professionally:-air-india-

Our competent pilots handled ILS failure incident professionally: Air India

Air India has clarified that non-schedule landing of its flight on September 11 at New Jersey was a remarkable achievement of its pilots. The radio altimeters had failed which in turn rendered TCAS and ILS non-functional. Thus, the cockpit crew took the quick decision to land safely at an alternate airport. Though the effort was remarkable to take a quick decision for safe landing, the issue of technical snag that occurred on September 11 needs to be addressed effectively.

 

The cockpit crew of the Air India Boeing 777-300 aircraft operating flight AI-101 of September 11, 2018, from Delhi (India) to New York successfully made a non-scheduled landing at New Jersey Airport braving adverse weather conditions and unexpected technical issues, and proving once again the class, expertise and experience of Air India’s pilots to face any such eventuality and come out in flying colours. The professional approach with which they navigated the flight to land safe speaks volumes of Air India’s enviable safety record based on the airline’s strong foundations of training, engineering and maintenance standards and skillset of its operations crew.

 

With its rich legacy of flying for over eight decades, Air India accords top priority to quality and safety standards and training of its human resources. Over and above the mandated training, Air India Pilots are given training to handle all emergencies in the Simulators and undergo a specialized CRM LOFT. This has further enhanced crew coordination and timely assessment of situation.

 

The cockpit crew comprising Commanders Capt. Rustom Palia and Capt. Sushant Singh and co-pilots Capt. R.S. Bhatti and Capt. RS Vikas decided to initiate a Go Around reporting an unstable approach. The decision to 'Go-Around' and divert was commendable and done in the interest of Flight Safety. The flight also carried more than adequate fuel reserves.

 

The radio altimeters failed which in turn rendered TCAS and ILS non-functional. The experience and expertise of our cockpit crew came to the fore and they landed safely at the alternate airport at Newark. The crew carefully weighed all options limited by terminal failure & adverse weather and diverted towards Newark. Besides ILS there are several other approach categories used by modern aircraft like RNAV, GPS, LNAV/ VNAV etc. Loss of some instruments is not a serious cause of concern as our pilots are well trained to handle these exigencies.

19 Sep 2018
air-india-divestment-options-uncertain

Air India divestment options uncertain

By IndianMandarins 19 Sep 2020

The government is given four options on dealing with the divestment issue of the debt-ridden Air India. However, it is uncertain whether the government may be able to work on any of the given options in FY21.
A report submitted by Ernst & Young India, which is the transaction adviser on the issue, to the inter-ministerial group set up to coordinate and sort out issues regarding AI divestment, contains the following four options:
First, keeping the debt level at Rs 23,286 crore or reducing it further while changing the timelines.
Second, assigning no pre-fixed debt level and letting bidders quote a combined debt and equity value.
Third, the Government should continue running AI for the next 2-3 years.
Fourth and last, winding up AI thereafter.
The report points out that in view of the corona virus-induced global and domestic economic downturn, potential investors in the airline business are seen struggling to manage their own existing businesses. In this climate, it is difficult to predict how the divestment proposal of AI may be received, considering the company has a combined debt-cum-liabilities burden of about Rs 90,000 crore.
“The choice is between privatizing or closing down Air India,” Aviation Minister H. S. Puri recently stated in the Parliament. Based on the suggestions, the core group of secretaries and the ministerial panel handling the sale of the national carrier will decide the future course of action although it is unclear if the government will be able to decide on the much-delayed privatization during the current year.

our-competent-pilots-handled-ils-failure-incident-professionally:-air-india-

Our competent pilots handled ILS failure incident professionally: Air India

By IndianMandarins 19 Sep 2018

Air India has clarified that non-schedule landing of its flight on September 11 at New Jersey was a remarkable achievement of its pilots. The radio altimeters had failed which in turn rendered TCAS and ILS non-functional. Thus, the cockpit crew took the quick decision to land safely at an alternate airport. Though the effort was remarkable to take a quick decision for safe landing, the issue of technical snag that occurred on September 11 needs to be addressed effectively.

 

The cockpit crew of the Air India Boeing 777-300 aircraft operating flight AI-101 of September 11, 2018, from Delhi (India) to New York successfully made a non-scheduled landing at New Jersey Airport braving adverse weather conditions and unexpected technical issues, and proving once again the class, expertise and experience of Air India’s pilots to face any such eventuality and come out in flying colours. The professional approach with which they navigated the flight to land safe speaks volumes of Air India’s enviable safety record based on the airline’s strong foundations of training, engineering and maintenance standards and skillset of its operations crew.

 

With its rich legacy of flying for over eight decades, Air India accords top priority to quality and safety standards and training of its human resources. Over and above the mandated training, Air India Pilots are given training to handle all emergencies in the Simulators and undergo a specialized CRM LOFT. This has further enhanced crew coordination and timely assessment of situation.

 

The cockpit crew comprising Commanders Capt. Rustom Palia and Capt. Sushant Singh and co-pilots Capt. R.S. Bhatti and Capt. RS Vikas decided to initiate a Go Around reporting an unstable approach. The decision to 'Go-Around' and divert was commendable and done in the interest of Flight Safety. The flight also carried more than adequate fuel reserves.

 

The radio altimeters failed which in turn rendered TCAS and ILS non-functional. The experience and expertise of our cockpit crew came to the fore and they landed safely at the alternate airport at Newark. The crew carefully weighed all options limited by terminal failure & adverse weather and diverted towards Newark. Besides ILS there are several other approach categories used by modern aircraft like RNAV, GPS, LNAV/ VNAV etc. Loss of some instruments is not a serious cause of concern as our pilots are well trained to handle these exigencies.

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